PR Campaigns – The blog

November 25, 2008

Tom Peters on Presentations

Filed under: Iris Public Relations — knish21087 @ 1:45 pm
Tags: ,

Being able to give a strong presentation is one of the key factors to pitching a PR campaign.  There are quite a few amazing public speakers out there for us to learn from, Tom Peters being one of them.  I found a blog called Tom Peters on Presentations where he gives many useful hints on how to give a good presentation.  Many people bring up the ability to tell a good story as a good characteristic to have when presenting.  One thing Peters offers as a tip is to “CONNECT! CONNECT! CONNECT!”  Sometimes I think it is hard to really connect with the audience, especially when you are trying to remain professional.  What are some ways to really connect with the audience?  How can you appeal to their emotions but still get your point across?  Maybe this presentation by Tom Peters can help give some insight.  It’s called Educate for a Creative Society.

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6 Comments »

  1. Two tips on how to connect. Know your audience, and then talk to them as if they were sitting in your living room.

    Even in a room of 500 you can connect if you see it as 500 individuals, not a mass audience.

    Comment by Terry — November 25, 2008 @ 3:02 pm | Reply

  2. I agree that it is hard to connect with the audience. This is especially true with the presentations that we have to give in a couple weeks because only a fraction of the audience, our client and teacher, care about what we are proposing. I understand that they are the most important audience member to connect to but I would like to connect with the rest of the audience as well. The only thing I can think of is to try and speak in more board terms when discussing our tactics. That these tactics can be useful for other organizations and companies. It is definitely something to give some thought to.

    Comment by erikanp2004 — November 30, 2008 @ 4:16 pm | Reply

  3. I know we are all very busy students and sometimes in the rush of planning and prioritizing, we forget to rehearse as much as we should. In this the flow and rhythm of our presentation get lost and that can cause a disconnect in the relationship between the presenter and the audience. I feel that this is the best way to “connect” to your audience. Now you should still research your audience and know them, but I feel like this goes hand and hand preparation. It is something that gets sacrificed in the time when everything hits the fan.

    Comment by wackyzachy47 — December 2, 2008 @ 10:33 am | Reply

  4. I agree that in order to connect, even to a large audience it’s important to make the presentation more personal. As we learned in class, reaching an audience on an emotional level is one way to do this. Therefore, knowing your audience is vital to the presentation’s success. Although it’s not easy, it’s necessary to put thought and consideration into the preparation of a presentation.

    Comment by marialinda17 — December 2, 2008 @ 10:49 am | Reply

  5. Getting personal seems to be the number one way to get your message across, in presentations or pitches. People need to see that you are trying to meet their needs and support them, not your bottom line or ideal.

    Comment by agilliam — December 2, 2008 @ 11:50 am | Reply

  6. I like the idea of speaking like you are in your living room or an intimate setting when giving a presentation, despite the number in the audience a lot. It is easy to fall into the cliche idea that a large group of people deserve a formal and professional presentation, when in reality, most people probably prefer a deeper, more personal connection. When someone seems as if they are speaking to you, it is a lot easier to stay engaged and care what they actually have to say as opposed to feeling like you are just one person lost in the masses. I have a difficult time of finding balance between being personal and being professional, but I think that it is a talent everyone should try and master.

    Comment by kristarogers — December 2, 2008 @ 12:17 pm | Reply


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